Prostatitis

Also indexed as:Prostadynia, Acute Bacterial Prostatitis, Chronic Abacterial Prostatitis, Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis, Chronic Nonbacterial Prostatitis, Acute Bacterial Prostatitis
Prostate inflammation can lead to daily discomfort. Learn more about the four forms of prostatitis, and find relief for symptoms. According to research or other evidence, the following self-care steps may be helpful.
Supplement Amount Why
Quercetin
1,000 mg daily 3 stars [3 stars]
Quercetin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects and may reduce symptoms of chronic prostatitis.
Bromelain
2,000 to 9,000 mcu per day 2 stars [2 stars]
The enzyme bromelain has anti-inflammatory effects. A study showed that bromelain combined with quercetin and papain significantly improved symptoms.
Cranberry
1,500 mg per day of dried cranberry powder for six months 2 stars [2 stars]
A preliminary study found that dried cranberry powder improved urinary symptoms in men with prostatitis.
Rye Pollen Extract
Two tablets of flower pollen extract twice per day 2 stars [2 stars]
An extract of flower pollen, derived primarily from rye, may improve symptoms of chronic prostatitis and prostadynia.
Bee Pollen
Refer to label instructions 1 star [1 star]
In prostatitis patients, preliminary research has found that bee pollen may improve symptoms in some men.
Pau d’Arco
Refer to label instructions 1 star [1 star]
Pau d’arco extract has been used traditionally for prostatitis. The herb exerts antibacterial activity against E.coli, the most common cause of two types of prostatitis.
Pygeum
Refer to label instructions 1 star [1 star]
In a preliminary trial, men with chronic prostatitis who were given pygeum extract saw improvement of symptoms and laboratory evaluation of the prostate and urinary tract.
Saw Palmetto
Refer to label instructions 1 star [1 star]
Saw palmetto has been used historically for prostatitis symptoms. The herb contains constituents that help to reduce swelling and inflammation.
Zinc
Refer to label instructions 1 star [1 star]
Zinc has antibacterial activity and is a key factor in the natural resistance of male urinary tract infections. Supplementing with it may improve postatitis.
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by some in the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

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The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Self-treatment is not recommended for life-threatening conditions that require medical treatment under a doctor's care. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2015.